Wyoming Investor Asserts Awareness of Elephants Being A Keystone Species

Elephants are a keystone species. As a keystone species, they play a unique role in shaping their ecosystem by, trampling forests and dense grasslands, making room for smaller species to co-exist, they also create water holes used by other wildlife as they dig dry riverbeds when rainfall is low.

Wyoming, September 22nd, 2021

Elephants Being A Keystone Species

Megaherbivores the world over have disproportional effects on their environment such as the African Bush elephant (Loxodonta Africana). Such is the case with the African Bush elephant that dominates mammalian biomass in sub-Saharan savannas, they have the scope to transform landscapes crafting their ecosystem and of other species.

It is of no surprise, megaherbivores need a healthy appetite to maintain their mass and their cruicial role as a species on which other species in an ecosystem largely depend, such that if they were removed the ecosystem would change drastically. They can eat up to 136 kilograms (300 pounds) of food and drink 113 to 190 liters (30 to 50 gallons) of water in one day. With such damage being done to elephants, there is an urgent need to find ways to protect the remaining wild populations.

Elephants are a keystone species. As a keystone species, they play a unique role in shaping their ecosystem by, trampling forests and dense grasslands, making room for smaller species to co-exist, they also create water holes used by other wildlife as they dig dry riverbeds when rainfall is low.

In central African forests, up to 30 percent of tree species may require elephants to help with dispersal and germination (World Wildlife Fund, https://www.worldwildlife.org/species/african-elephant)

One unique way to address the awareness that elephants are a keystone species is to support The Elephant Sactuary.

How The Elephant Sactuary Helps The Species

The Elephant Sactuary provides captive elephants with individualized care, the companionship of a herd, and the opportunity to live out their lives in a safe haven dedicated to their well-being.

In a news media interview between The Elephant Sactuary, Education Manager Joy Owens, and philanthropist, software developer, and NHS Patient Constituent Jake Heath-Grey discusses how The Elephant Sactuary helps the species as reported, and in conjunction with Wyoming Investor.

Jake Heath-Grey: “The sanctuary conducts an amazing role in providing individualized care to the species. Can you explain in detail what the sactuary does?”

Joy Owens: “Since 1995, The Sanctuary has provided refuge for 28 elephants who are retired from zoos and circuses. There are currently 10 elephant residents with room for more. The Elephant Sanctuary in Tennessee began on 110 acres and has grown to three separate and protected, natural habitats, spanning over more than 2,700 acres.

The Elephant Sanctuary in Tennessee provides elephants retired from entertainment and exhibition with herd, home, and individualized veterinary and husbandry care for life. Elephants that have lived their lives in captivity have an opportunity at The Sanctuary to live in an expansive habitat that allows for a range of natural behaviors.

Many of the elephants suffer long-term health and complex behavioral issues common to elephants that have spent their lives in captivity, such as tuberculosis, osteomyelitis, obesity, arthritis, and aggression. Because elephants have complex physical and social needs, successful outcomes are measured not only by the elephant’s physical health, but also their social, behavioral and psychological well-being.”

Jake Heath-Grey “Can you share the importance of education to The Elephant Sanctuary mission?”

Joy Owens: “Yes, The Elephant Sanctuary offers a range of education for the community. Our Life Long Partners program is designed especially for adult learners, this program will introduce The Elephant Sanctuary’s mission and work, reveal the stories of our resident elephants, and offer basic knowledge on elephants as a species.”

Future Awareness of Elephants

Scientists generally agree that we need to research and understand how they navigate their physical and social worlds. Their perspective is quite different from our own. Elephants spend the majority of their day roaming across large distances to forage for grasses, fruits, roots, and bark. During the dry season, elephants use their tusks to dig for water. This not only allows the elephants to survive in dry environments and when droughts strike, but also provides water for other animals that share harsh habitats.

Working in conjunction with each other for the future awareness of elephants, Wyoming Investor, a software company has made a pledge to support specific search engine optimization for donations, education, and the mission of The Elephant Sanctuary along with free distribution to media outlets to raise future awareness of elephants with this interview.

Wyoming Investor, engages in community support and agrees the underlying assumption for elephants impact should focus on the current philosophy of conservation, which is to restore and maintain biological diversity, and where loosing species becomes unacceptable.

Link To DonationThe Elephant Sanctuary | Link To Search Engine Optimization: Wyoming Investor

Interview between: Jake Heath-Grey and Joy Owens

Software, Coding, Search Engine Optimization and Distribution provided by: Wyoming Investor

Elephant Photograph Credits: The Elephant Sanctuary in Tennessee 

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